Best kept secrets of New Mexico

Most people think they already know everything there is to know about New Mexico. They When they plan trips to the area, they just keep on going to all the places that tourists frequent, blissfully unaware that the best parts of the State are those that only locals know about.

So next time, before planning a trip, look for these best kept secrets that only the people in New Mexico’s bustling communities with cozy homes and installed garage doors know about:

The Lightning Field in Quemado, New Mexico

In the desert of New Mexico, at a very remote location in Quemado, stands 400 polished stainless steel poles. These poles are two inches in diameter, around 20 feet in height and spaced 220 feet apart. It has pointed tips and stands in a grid array that is one mile by one kilometer. Sounds weird right? Well this is called The Lightning Field, created by Walter de Maria and recognized as one of the late twentieth century’s most significant land art.

Standing in the middle of nowhere and accommodating no more than six visitors a night, the place is very exclusive, camping is not permitted and visits without reservations are not allowed.

House of Eternal Return in Santa Fe, New Mexico

George R.R. Martin, American author and creator of the hugely successful Song of Fire and Ice from which the Game of Thrones series is based, owns a vacant bowling alley in Santa Fe that how houses interactive art installations. The place is called the House of Eternal Return.

Martin leases the place to a 135-member group of artists called the Meow Wolf art collective, known for their spectacular installations. The very first installation that has been created in the House of Eternal Return is a two-story Victorian house of the Selig family which disappeared. Here, visitors can look through the family’s clothes, books, personal effects and the like. Through their adventure, they can also stumble through cosmic portals into strange worlds.

New Mexico Mystery Stone in Los Lunas, Mexico

Hidden on the side of a remote mountain in Los Lunas is the Mystery Stone, also known as the Decalogue Stone. It bears an inscription that is said to be of extinct language, alternately identified as a form of Paleo-Hebrew or Cypriotic Greek.

The stone was allegedly first written about by New Mexico archeologist Frank Hibben who claimed to have been guided to an area by an individual who first discovered it in the 1880s. Harvard scholar Robert Pfeiffer claims that is is a record of the Judeo-Christian Ten Commandments. However, Dixie Perkins, an epigrapher claims that the inscription is Cypriotic Greek in origin, used around 500 BC in the Mediterranean region.

Bisti Badlands in Farmington, New Mexico

Discover some rock formations that seem to have come from an alien world. In the arid desert of northwestern New Mexico can be found the Bisti Badlands, the striking stone formations that look like undulating fungal shapes and is made up of sandstone and shale.